AIS will be presenting a new series of Azure ‘n’ Action Café webinars in early 2014. We will have expert speakers offering new and exciting content in a convenient “lunch and learn” online format, one Wednesday a month, from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. EST.

Our first presentation date is Wednesday, January 29. You won’t want to miss this session, as we’ll cover both updates to Azure and new ways to extend your data center.

In this session we will share an example Platform as a Service (PaaS) Web Role workload in Azure.  This workload will help you understand how Azure constructs can be used in support of different scenarios.

The workload we’ll discuss makes use of the following Constructs:

  • A private data center extended into multiple Azure Regional Data Centers (East Coast / West Coast) with IPSEC tunnels
  • The on-premises AD / DNS infrastructure extended into Azure IaaS
  • An on-premises SQL Server 2012 Server database supporting a High Availability Group (Synchronous) with a local primary and a remote secondary located in Azure IaaS
  • The PaaS Web Role Load Balanced across data centers using Azure Traffic Manager

Click here to register!

2013 was a great year for AIS — we worked on exciting projects for our terrific clients, built some cool apps and won some cool awards. We were honored with the 2013 Microsoft Mid-Atlantic Cloud Practice Award and are among the first Amazon Web Services partners to earn a “SharePoint on AWS” competency. And throughout the year, we wrote and blogged about our passion for cloud computing, SharePoint, going mobile, and doing “more with less” for our government and commercial clients.

Here’s a round-up of 2013’s most popular posts and series, in case you missed them:

We have big plans for the blog for 2014 — more posts, more events and more compelling content from the entire AIS team. Stay connected with us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, and check out our Events page for details on our free presentations and webinars.

Happy holidays, and thanks for reading!

Despite the terms Dependency Inversion Principle (DIP), Inversion of Control (IoC), Dependency Injection (DI) and Service Locator existing for many years now, developers are often still confused about their meaning and use.  When discussing software decoupling, many developers view the terms as interchangeable or synonymous, which is hardly the case.  Aside from misunderstandings when discussing software decoupling with colleagues, this misinterpretation of terms can lead to confusion when tasked with designing and implementing a decoupled software solution.  Hence, it’s important to differentiate between what is principle, pattern and technique.
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Microsoft has revamped its licensing model for Dynamics CRM 2013.  Here’s a summary of the information from the latest Microsoft documentation.

There are three basic versions of Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013, and each has its own particular licensing requirements:

  1. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013 On-Premises: Most useful for organizations that do their deployments in-house.  You must purchase a license for each server that will run the CRM Server software.  You must also purchase Client Access License (CAL) for each user or device that will access the software.
  2. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013 Online: Used for solutions that will be hosted in the cloud. You must purchase a User Subscription License (USL) for each user that will access the solution. USLs are assigned to a named user, which means that USLs cannot be shared. A single USL licenses the user to access any instance of Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013 or earlier associated with the same tenant.  (USLs do not include use rights for Yammer or Skype.)
  3. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013 SPLA: Used by service providers and independent software vendors who license CRM to provide solutions to customers. You must purchase a Subscriber Access License (SAL) for each unique individual user who is authorized to access or otherwise use the licensed products. SALs are assigned to a named user, which means that SALs cannot be shared. A SAL will authorize a user to access any number of instances of CRM 2013 or earlier running on the organization’s servers. Read More…
My decision to join AIS six years ago was a revelation. After almost seven years spent working as an embedded IT analyst for various government customers, I joined AIS to support a customer who was implementing SharePoint.  I soaked up everything I could about this (at the time) brave new world of SharePoint. I loved it.

SharePoint 2003 had been available for use in my previous office where I had initially set up out-of-the-box team sites for working groups to support a large department-wide initiative. I found it empowering to quickly set up sites, lists and libraries without any fuss (or custom coding) to get people working together. Working with my new team, I gained insight into what we could do with this tool in terms of workflow, integration and branding. It got even better when we migrated to SharePoint 2007.  We made great strides in consolidating our websites and communicating to those who were interested exactly what the tools could do in terms of collaboration and knowledge management.

This ability for a power user to quickly create a variety of new capabilities exposed a deeper customer need – easier communications with IT.  While we had all this great expertise and firepower to create and maintain IT tools and services, our core customer base did not have an easy way to quickly and reliably communicate their needs in a manner that matched their high operational tempo. It was a problem. We needed a way for our customers to quickly and easily communicate with us in order to really hear what they needed to meet their mission goals and work more effectively. Read More…