angularI recently attended ng-conf (the annual Angular conference) held in Salt Lake City during the first week of May. Over 1500 developers were there. Of course the big news was that Angular 2, the next version of the framework, has moved from beta to release candidate.  Angular 2 (which departs substantially from earlier versions of Angular) has a forward looking emphasis, incorporating emerging technologies like web components, ES 2015 (the new version of JavaScript) and TypeScript.  You can read more about it here: http://angular.io.

Not surprisingly most of the workshops at the conference focused on Angular 2.  A single session track ran on both Day 1 and Day 3 and you can find the YouTube videos for those sessions on YouTube at this link: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOETEcp3DkCq788xapkP_OU-78jhTf68j.  There were multiple concurrent sessions on Day 2 and not all of them were captured on video. I attended several that covered building components in Angular 2, TypeScript and unit testing.

Developer uptake has been strong with upwards of 360,000 developers who are active on the Angular 2 site.  Several enterprise partners that have started using Angular 2 were present, including Capital One, Fidelity Investments and the Weather Channel. Read More…

In Part 1 of this blog series, we outlined the case for a Service Catalog driven approach for Enterprise DevOps. At AIS, after having worked with several of our Enterprise clients with their DevOps journey, we harvested our learnings in the form of a fully managed service catalog – AIS Service Catalog. AIS Service Catalog is a Microsoft Azure focused SaaS offering that is designed to jumpstart your DevOps efforts by bringing you the benefits of the service catalog driven approach.

ASC

A Service Catalog for Microsoft Azure

In Part 1 of this blog post series, we identified four key features of a Service Catalog that are fundamental to establishing DevOps in an enterprise. Let us briefly talk about how AIS Service Catalog realizes these features using Microsoft Azure specific building blocks. Read More…

 By now, DevOps is well-established within web companies, unicorns, and product companies—and especially among companies targeting the cloud. To spare you the lengthy introduction, DevOps brings “development” and “operations” together as a moniker for company-wide collaboration that will improve business agility. The key DevOps traits are:

  • Involving Ops teams in early stages of development
  • Focus on automating all aspects of the IT life cycle
  • Continuous improvement
  • Maturity of self-service model

Enterprise DevOps Challenges

Despite its success within smaller companies, implementing DevOps in large enterprises has proven to be more difficult. Rachael Shannon-Solomon writes in The Wall Street Journal that DevOps is perhaps better suited for startups at the current time than for enterprise IT. Regardless of whether you agree with her article, it does raise some important points related to siloed structures, organizational change and affecting cultural change on a large scale.

The issue is not that enterprises aren’t adopting DevOps (just look at the latest State of DevOps report for evidence to the contrary); it is the unique set of challenges that large enterprises face that make it harder for DevOps to succeed. Let’s take a closer look: Read More…