Success Stories:Public utility creates the best dam outage tracking system ever

The Challenge

This federally owned public utility needed a digital system for scheduling dam turbine maintenance outages among multiple teams and organizations.

The Solution

AIS created a cloud-based outage tracking system in just six months, also delivering a power capacity forecasting tool.

The Results

With the outage tracking system, the utility and its partners have real-time insight into maintenance outage schedules and can better meet power demand while also saving money.

Get customer unstuck

The utility had been trying to build a digital outage tracking system for several years but had never moved past the requirements stage. AIS encouraged the customer to bring in an AIS scrum team and include AIS in the requirements gathering sessions to help brainstorm solutions and guide the scrum process. By the end of this process, the project requirements had changed significantly, but the customer agreed for the better. In short, bringing in the AIS scrum team helped get the customer unstuck.

Deliver system in six months

By using platform as a service (PaaS) offerings in Microsoft Azure, we created a web-based outage tracking system in just six months. Building in the cloud not only sped development but simplified system access by the utility and its multiple partners.

Create reporting tools

AIS also developed a capacity forecasting tool that the utility uses to more precisely map available turbine capacity to power generation needs to eliminate under or oversupply.

We also incorporated Microsoft Power BI into the system to allow utility employees to build their own reports to meet frequently changing regulatory requirements.

Gain real-time insight into outage management

With this system, the utility and its partners have real-time information on scheduling and managing outage information throughout the outage lifecycle—from planning and analysis through response and reporting.

Save money

The utility projects savings of up to $300,000 annually by reducing power generation oversupply during outages and nearly $400,000 annually in outage planning and coordination costs. It also estimates reducing power “spill” during outages by 65 percent.