“How does one choose between all the various PaaS options available in Azure?”

This question comes up very often at conferences and forums. The answer, as you might have guessed, is “it depends…”

In this blog post, however, we will go beyond “it depends” and try to describe some factors that can help you choose between Azure PaaS offerings.

(I assume that you are familiar with the concept of PaaS. If not, please briefly review my introductory blog post on PaaS.)

Let’s gets started.  We will cover the following Azure PaaS offerings: Read More…

Companies are adopting Docker containers at a remarkable pace and for a good reason – Docker containers are turning out to be key enablers for a micro-services based architecture.

As a quick recap, Docker containers are:

  • Encapsulated, deployable components that can run as isolated instances
  • Small in size with a fast boot-up time
  • Include tools that enable containerized application images to be easily moved across the public cloud and on-premises
  • Capable of applying limits on physical resources consumed by any given application

Given the popularity of Docker containers, it should come as no surprise that the Azure platform already provides first-class support for a container hosting solution, in the form of Azure Container Service (ACS). ACS makes it simple to create a cluster of Virtual Machines that can run containerized applications. ACS relies on popular open-source tools – with Docker as the container format, and a choice of Marathon, DC/OS, Docker Swarm and Kubernetes for orchestration and scheduling, etc. All this makes it possible to easily run containerized workloads on Azure in a portable manner.

But the Docker containerization story on Azure does not stop here.

It is also being weaved more and more into existing PaaS offerings, including Azure Batch, Azure App Service and Azure Service Fabric. Let’s briefly review the latest developments to see how Docker integrates with Azure PaaS: Read More…

In this video blog, AIS’ CTO Vishwas Lele walks us through provisioning a Docker Swarm cluster using the Azure Container Service (ACS). Docker Swarm is a native clustering technology for Docker containers, which allows a pool of underlying Docker Hosts to appear as a single virtual Docker host. Containers can then be provisioned through the standard Docker API. The Azure Container service takes care of provisioning the underlying Docker host virtual machines, installing the required software (Docker plus  Docker host), and configuring the cluster. Once the cluster is provisioned, Vishwas demonstrates connecting to the master node to spin up containers on the cluster which hosts an ASP.NET application.

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