First announced as a public preview in September 2017, Global VNet Peering is now generally available in all Azure public regions.

Similar to virtual network peering within the same Azure region, Global VNet Peering now lets you seamlessly connect virtual networks in different Azure regions. The connectivity between the peered virtual networks is routed through the Microsoft backbone infrastructure through private IP addresses. VNet peering provides virtual network connectivity without gateways, additional hops, or transit over the public internet. Global VNet Peering can simplify network designs which have cross-regional scenarios for data replication, disaster recovery, and database failover.

While similar, peering within the same region and peering across regions have unique constraints.  These are clearly identified in the Microsoft documentation, so check that out before you get started. Read More…

In a previous blog post I discussed Windows Azure PaaS / IaaS hybrid scenarios. Together with my colleague Jack O’Connell (Infrastructure Specialist extraordinaire), we set up each of the four scenarios outlined in the previous post including:

  • Using Windows Azure Virtual Network to provision a VPN to connect our on-premised infrastructure with a Windows Azure datacenter.
  • Set up front-end and back-end subnets.
  • Provision a set of Azure IaaS Virtual Machines and Azure Web Roles.
  • Install System Center Monitoring Pack for Windows Azure Applications on Azure-based machines.
  • Install System Center Operations on-premises in order to manage Azure-based resources.

Watch the following video for a quick walkthrough of the scenarios in action: