With the explosion of new sensors and service offerings producing geospatial telemetry, there’s an ever-increasing need for tools to gain business insights from this data. One of the premier tools for this in the geospatial domain is GeoServer.

Fully open-source and free to use, GeoServer provides Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) web service interfaces to rendering images or complete metadata in most common geospatial interchange formats. In a consulting capacity, Applied Information Sciences has leveraged Geoserver with great success, allowing us to deploy a complete software stack in minutes instead days or weeks. In this post I’ll give an overview of the DevOps practices we’ve applied to enable this capability, as well as a brief overview of the supporting technologies. Read More…

AIS developed a prototype web application that leverages open standards for real-time data sharing and geospatial processing. It’s highly suggested you read our first two blog posts on this application, part one and part two.

In this post, we are going to discuss three areas of improvement for the application. We wanted to improve collaboration, improve management of events by adding a search capability, and improve the edit capabilities. Read More…

AIS developed a prototype that highlights the features and capabilities of open standards for geospatial processing and real-time data sharing through web applications. If you haven’t already, please click here to read part one

After getting the VIIRS data into our application using GeoServer, our next objective was to enhance the prototype to demonstrate some of the exciting things AIS is able to do through the use of various web technologies. Our goal was to provide a highly collaborative environment where clients on a variety of devices could all interact in real time with map data.

Figure 1: 3D Map Displaying WMS Layers

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Because of our broad knowledge in building web applications, AIS decided to develop a prototype that highlights the features and capabilities of open standards for geospatial processing and data sharing through web applications.

We chose the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) as our data source for the demonstration. VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and radiometric data for civil and military Earth monitoring. (The Day/Night Band (DNB) datasets available from NOAA’s Comprehensive Large Array-Data Stewardship System are not quite in the format we need for our application, since they are sensor data records stored within an HDF5 container.)

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