AIS developed a prototype web application that leverages open standards for real-time data sharing and geospatial processing. It’s highly suggested you read our first two blog posts on this application, part one and part two.

In this post, we are going to discuss three areas of improvement for the application. We wanted to improve collaboration, improve management of events by adding a search capability, and improve the edit capabilities. Read More…

AIS developed a prototype that highlights the features and capabilities of open standards for geospatial processing and real-time data sharing through web applications. If you haven’t already, please click here to read part one

After getting the VIIRS data into our application using GeoServer, our next objective was to enhance the prototype to demonstrate some of the exciting things AIS is able to do through the use of various web technologies. Our goal was to provide a highly collaborative environment where clients on a variety of devices could all interact in real time with map data.

Figure 1: 3D Map Displaying WMS Layers

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Although AIS is proud to center their technology on Microsoft’s frameworks and technology stack, AIS is also adept at working with a broad range of other technologies to give clients solutions that are custom-tailored to their needs.

One such project is the recently released Web Report Editing Tool, or WebRET. WebRET was custom-built in the Ohio Development Center for the specific needs of our government client. In this instance, the client needed a back end that was compatible with the Java Runtime Environment, so we used JRuby on Rails to provide a modern yet JRE-compatible back end.

To learn more about the technologies used in WebRET, take a look at the whitepaper below.

Web Report Editing Tool Case Study (PDF)

Click here to read more about AIS’ custom application development service offerings and how they’ve helped our clients.

Because of our broad knowledge in building web applications, AIS decided to develop a prototype that highlights the features and capabilities of open standards for geospatial processing and data sharing through web applications.

We chose the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) as our data source for the demonstration. VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and radiometric data for civil and military Earth monitoring. (The Day/Night Band (DNB) datasets available from NOAA’s Comprehensive Large Array-Data Stewardship System are not quite in the format we need for our application, since they are sensor data records stored within an HDF5 container.)

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