Whether you are just starting your journey to Office 365, or you are expanding your usage of the platform, it’s important that you stop and define what you hope to accomplish in your project. User research is the most productive activity your team can do to define and shape your project. Many underestimate the value of investing time and money into user research when a team believes they already understand what needs to be built.

The Need to Define the Problem

A common misunderstanding with user research is that it’s intended to help create the solution. While it’s true that user research assists in this, the main purpose of user research is to define the problem you are trying to solve.

Often, in an attempt to save money, companies will reduce or jettison altogether user research. User research ensures a higher likelihood that your implementation will succeed and is well received and adopted. This makes end users feel like they had a voice in the project and that their unique challenges were considered. And the good news is that it’s not all or nothing. There are ways to do user research that will significantly help your project without breaking the budget.

An important distinction needs to be made that user research is not about asking people what their preferences are. While preferences can lend to insights, it is not the goal of user research. Erika Hall in her book Just Enough Research says:

“As you start interviewing people involved in business and design decisions, you might hear them refer to what they do or don’t like. ‘Like’ is not a part of the critical thinker’s vocabulary. On some level, we all want the things we do to be liked (particularly on Facebook), so it’s easy to treat likability as a leading success indicator. But the concept of ‘liking’ is as subjective as it is empty. It is a superficial and self-reported mental state unmoored from any particular behavior. This means you can’t get any useful insights from any given individual reporting that they like or hate a particular thing. I like horses, but I’m not going to buy any online.” (pg. 13)

What Can I Expect When Doing User Research?

Many companies that do not have in house user research experience are unaware of the key steps and activities used. Project goals and requirements vary, requiring slightly different approaches, but the core concepts are often the same.

The first thing that usually occurs is soliciting input from the project team or stakeholders before engaging end-users. These inputs can come in the form of workshops or interviews, but it is important at this stage to understand how the stakeholders involved in commissioning and running the project view the organization’s needs.

After gathering initial input, end-users need to be identified and interviewed to understand the many aspects of how they currently work, what their needs are, and how the various tools and processes they currently use do and do not satisfy their needs.

Below are some sample questions asked during a user interview for end-users regarding their existing intranet:

  • Is there content on the intranet you looked for and were unable to find?
  • What do you do when you cannot find the information you are looking for? Has this happened with the current intranet?
  • What are other tools and applications you need to do your work?
  • What are the most important things that the organization needs from you and you need from the organization?

The answers to these questions and the insights gleaned can be distilled to define the core issues that a new modern workplace solution needs to solve. From here, the team can work together on what specific solutions will address the issues, goals, and needs of the end-users.

AIS did this recently for the ACA Compliance Group in a project to help them roll out Microsoft Teams and Planner. Through systematic user research, the AIS team was able to identify opportunities to leverage these tools to address ACA’s collaboration and content management needs. Read more about our work with ACA Compliance Group.

Other Benefits of User Research

While the primary benefit of user research is to define the problem and help your team ultimately marry that to the correct technological solution, there are many other benefits of doing user research. Here are a few.

  1. It generates interest inside of the organization. When doing research, many people will get a chance to be heard, and often times those are the very individuals that are some of the biggest supporters as the project moves along.
  2. It helps with change management and ultimately increases adoption of the final solution. Change is hard and bringing users into that process greatly increases the odds that the modern workplace solution they receive will aid them in their work. Nothing will slow down the adoption of a new solution faster than those who receive the solution feeling like their challenges were not taken into consideration.
  3. It helps your organization communicate the value of the new implementation in a way that appeals to people across the organization. It is always more impactful to frame your new investment in terms that will appeal to users.

Start Now and Continue to Iterate

If you take away one thing from this piece, I hope you realize the value of user research and how it can bring unique insights to your project that are otherwise left untapped. User research is one of those activities that truly never finishes because an organization and its people are constantly changing, but the more research is used, the better the end result.

Nielsen-Norman Group, a well-known user experience firm publishes its best intranets every year, and it is no mistake that time after time user research is a core component of these successful projects. In this year’s report, it specifically mentions the value of bringing in outside firms to bring expertise and perspective. AIS has years of experience helping organizations do great user research. If you are planning your next Office 365 project, please reach out to AIS for a Modern Workplace Assessment and begin your journey to building a successful modern workplace solution!

In this post, I will show you how DevOps practices can add value to a variety of Office 365 development scenarios. The practices we will discuss are Infrastructure as Code, Continuous Integration, and Continuous Delivery. The advances in DevOps and SharePoint Framework (SPFx) have allowed us to make advancements in the way that we develop software and have improved our efficiency.

Infrastructure as Code (IaC)

Practicing IaC means that the infrastructure your applications depend on is created and maintained by code that is source controlled, tested, and deployed to production much like software. When discussing IaC, we’re typically talking about provisioning resources to a cloud provider. In our case, the “infrastructure” is Office 365 – a SaaS product with extensive customization and configuration options.  

While you could manage your O365 tenant with PowerShell, the code-centric and template-based PnP Provisioning Framework aligns better with this practice because: 

  1. Using the frameworks declarative XML syntax, you describe what you want to exist rather than writing code to manage how it gets created.
  2. It is easier for developers to run idempotent deployments to enact the desired state of your Office 365 tenant.  

While originally developed to support SharePoint Online and on-premise deployments, you can see in its latest schema that it has expanded to support Microsoft Teams, OneDrive, and Active Directory.  

Continuous Integration (CI) 

The practice of continuously integrating first means that your team has established the habit of frequently merging small batches of changes into a central code repository. Upon that merge, we automatically build and test the code to quickly identify bugs and quality issues.  

SharePoint Framework is a commonly used tool used to extend the capabilities of SharePoint Online and on-premise Much like the Provisioning Framework, SharePoint Framework is expanding to support other Office 365 services. You can currently use it to develop for Microsoft Teams and will soon be able to use it to develop Office Add-Ins.

Azure DevOps is a one-stop-shop service that provides everything you need throughout the software development lifecycle. For example, your team can version control your projects source code in Repos. After merging changes, use Pipelines to trigger a CI process that runs the build and test tasks of your SharePoint Framework solution.  

Continuous Delivery (CD)

Continuous Delivery, the practice of running automated deployments through a sequence of environments, starts after a completed CI process. Azure DevOps Pipelines will again be the tool of choice to execute the deployment procedures against each environment.

Example Solution

A solution demonstrating how to use the technologies and practices described above is available on Applied Information ScienceGitHub account. The result is a pipeline capable of receiving frequent changes to O365 configuration and SPFx applications from 1 or many developers, verifying the quality of the change, and deploying it to a series of environments.

Dev Tenant Diagram

I encourage you to explore the source code using the following summary as a guide. You’ll find the solution organized into three areas – SPFx, Provisioning, and Pipeline.

SPFx

A simple hello world web part was created using the yeoman generator. Jest was added to test the code. Npm and gulp scripts are used to build and package the source code which produces an sppkg file.

Provisioning

The PnP Provisioning Template XML file found here defines the desired state of the target tenant. The following is the desired state:

  1. Install the SPFx App into the tenant App Catalog.
  2. Create a site collection that will host our web parts page.
  3. Install the SPFx App to the Site Collection.
  4. Create a page that will host our web part.
  5. Add the web part to the page.

By using parameters for the tenant URL and site owner, the same template can be deployed to multiple environments. A PowerShell build script bundles the template and all required files, such as the SPFx sppkg file, into a single pnp file ready for deployment.

Pipeline

A multi-stage YAML pipeline defined in the Pipeline folder of the example solution runs the following process:

  1. Build, test, and package the SPFx and Provisioning Template source code.
  2. Deploy the prerequisite SharePoint infrastructure to the tenant if it does not already exist.
  3. Install and configure the SPFx web part.
  4. Repeat #2 and #3 for all environments.

Build Process Diagram

Secret variables, such as the username and password used to connect to the tenant, are only referenced in the pipeline. The values are set and encrypted in the Azure DevOps pipeline editor.

Variables Diagram with Passwords

Conclusion

In the not-too-distant past, it was high effort to write unit tests for a SharePoint solution, and most deployments were manual. In this post, I have shown you how advancements in the platform and tooling have changed this. The mentality, practices, and tools brought by DevOps can improve the pace and quality of any software development and infrastructure management project, including projects building upon Office 365.

As promised in the previous blog post, here is a detailed explanation of how to connect to APIs secured in the Azure AD from SharePoint Framework (SPFx) web parts. Please read part I of this blog for a thorough understanding of the SharePoint Framework, comparing it with other models, and its constraints/disadvantages before diving in further.  

Connecting to APIs is essential functionality in today’s communication as it extends the versatile communication with outside data repositories. SharePoint web parts can render data not only from SharePoint lists and libraries but also from external repositories. The data can be owned by anyone outside the organization. The external repositories can be connected for data retrieval from SharePoint via API (Application Programming Interface) call. The external repositories can be on different platforms, domains, etc. SPFx comes with many namespaces to leverage the communication between the SPFx web part from SharePoint online with other repositories via API call.

Types of API Communications from SPFx

  • Connect to SharePoint APIs to access data residing in SharePoint (SPHttpClient with OData) 
  • This is access data residing in SharePoint lists/libraries 
  • Connect to Microsoft Graph (MSGraphClient through MSGraphClientFactory) 
  • This is access users and other user-related info from Azure Active Directory (AAD) 
  • Connect to enterprise APIs secured in Azure AD (enterprise APIs using AadHttpClient & aadHttpClientFactory) 
  • Connect to Azure API secured in Azure AD from the SharePoint Framework web part in single-tenant implementation, where both Azure and SharePoint online are under the same tenant. This blog covers the details of implementing this functionality. 
  • Connect to Azure API secured in Azure AD from the SharePoint Framework web part in multi-tenant implementation, where both Azure and SharePoint online are in different tenant’s 
  • Connect to anonymous APIs (using HttpClient to connect to public APIs for weather etc.) 
  • Anonymous API’s are used to access any weather and other publicly available API’s

Connect to Azure AD Secured APIs

Microsoft Web API Permissions

Figure Credit: Microsoft

Pre-Requisites

If your environment is already set up, ensure you have the latest version of Yeoman SharePoint generator by entering: 

npm update – g @microsoft/generator-sharepoint@latest

Steps to Develop, Deploy, and Test SPFx Connecting to Function API Secured in Azure AD

Once all the pre-requisites are met, follow the steps below to develop, deploy, and test the SharePoint Framework connecting to Azure API secured in an Azure active directory. 

1. Create an Azure function (HttpTrigger) returning mock data

Create Azure Function

Figure: Create a new Azure function

New Function Created

Figure: New Azure function is created

2. Create a HttpTrigger & add C# code to return the list of orders

Create Http Trigger

Figure: C# Azure Function code to return the list of orders

DOWNLOAD THE AZURE FUNCTION CODE HERE

3. Secure the azure function by enabling the authentication/authorization via Azure Active Directory (AAD) and create an app in AAD. Verify azure function works when called from the browser.

Secure Azure Function Screenshot

Figure: Configure authentication/authorization for the Azure function

4. Enable ‘App Service Authentication’

Authenticating App Services Screenshot

Figure: Selection Azure Active Directory for authentication/authorization

5. Active Directory authentication is set up & the API is secured in an Azure AD
Register Azure Function

Fig: Registered Azure function in Azure AD

6. Enable CORS (Cross-Origin Resource Sharing). Even though Azure & SharePoint Online are in the same tenant, they are in different domains.

Cross Origin Resource Sharing

Figure: Configure CORS

7. Add the SharePoint tenant URL.

Add SharePoint for CORS

    Figure: Add the SharePoint for CORS to authenticate the SharePoint site in Azure

8. Azure function API is secured in Azure AD & the application ID will be used in the SPFx web part.


Azure function installed on AD

Figure: Azure function is registered in the Azure AD as an Enterprise application

9. SharePoint online tenant/admin center in O365.

Available sites in SharePoint admin center

Figure: Available sites in the SharePoint admin center

10. Create an SPFx web part project to render the data by connecting to API secured in Azure AAD. Use Yeomen to generate a web part. Use this link for more information on generating web parts.

Yeoman generator to generate SPFx web part

Figure: Yeoman generator to generate SPFx web part

11. Add web API permission requests in config/package-solution.json file.

src\webparts\[webpartname]\config\package-solution.json – add two web api permission requests

 “webApiPermissionRequests”: [
{
“resource”: “contoso-api”,
“scope”: “user_impersonation”
},

{
“resource”: “Windows Azure Active Directory”,
“scope”: “User.Read”
},
]

SPFx web part configuration file

Figure: API permissions in SPFx web part configuration file

12. Import namespaces for enterprise API communication.

import AadHttpClient to connect with API in src\webparts\[webpartname]\[webpartname]WebPart.ts

import { AadHttpClient, HttpClientResponse } from ‘@microsoft/sp-http’;

src\webparts\[webpartname]\[webpartname]WebPart.ts

namespaces for enterprise API communication

DOWNLOAD THE WEB PART CODE HERE

13. Build, package, and upload the package to the SharePoint App Catalog.

gulp bundle –ship && gulp package-solution –ship

gulp clean (for redeploying after updates)

14. Add the SPFx package to the tenant app catalog in your Office 365 tenant. SPFx deploys API related file to the SharePoint admin center.

SPFx deploys API related file to the SharePoint

15. Approve requested API permissions.

From the SharePoint admin center in Office 365/SharePoint, approve the API from API Management page

Once the API is approved, the SPFx web part can be added to the SharePoint site page


API permissions are available in SharePoint online admin center

Figure: API permissions are available in SharePoint online admin center

16. Create a new site page from the developers’ site and add the SPFx web part.

Add the web part to SharePoint page

Figure: Add the web part to the SharePoint page

17. If all goes well, your web part will be rendered with data that is served from the API call!
Rendered with Data

SPFx – Connect to APIs Gotchas

  • Connecting to API secured in Azure AD did not work via SPFx AadHttpClient & aadHttpClientFactory in SharePoint 2019 on-premise. The this.context.aadHttpClientFactory did not work. I choose a web part that is part of “SharePoint 2019 and SharePoint Online” when creating the SPFx web part via the Yeomen generator. Choose only ‘SharePoint Online’ to use AadHttpClient & aadHttpClientFactory
  • Microsoft example code did not work as it is. The azure function needed a slight tweak. Additional permission must be added “webApiPermissionRequests” in the config\package-solution.json

{

“resource”: “Windows Azure Active Directory”,

“scope”: “User.Read”

}

  • Single-tenant vs multiple tenant access
    • First, I set up azure function and secure it in AAD API in a personal MSDN subscription tenant and tried to connect from Developer (Free) O365/SharePoint Online SPFx web part. But the API permission in the SharePoint admin center could not get approved. The permission to access API from a different tenant did not work with the way Azure function API is configured in AAD.
    • To overcome that issue set up an Azure tenant under developer O365 and with the same credential. The API was able to get approved. More Info…
    • To overcome this, need to configure AAD API authentication to multi-tenant. More info…
  • gulp clean – important when re-deploying, otherwise new updates will not get updated
  • Debugging is quite important for troubleshooting 

TRY IT YOURSELF! DOWNLOAD THE CODE TO GET STARTED.

Further ahead:

Exchange 2010 is at the end of its journey, and what a long road it’s been! For many customers, it has been a workhorse product facilitating excellent communications with their employees. It’s sad to see the product go, but it’s time to look to the future, and the future is in the Microsoft Cloud with Exchange Online

What does End of Support mean for my organization?

email security exchange 2010 end of support risks

While Exchange 2010 isn’t necessarily vanishing from the messaging ecosystem, support of the product ends in all official capacities on January 14, 2020. Additionally, Office 2010 will be hitting the end of support on October 13, 2020, which means your old desktop clients will also be unsupported within the same year. What this means is that businesses using Exchange and Office applications will be left without support from Microsoft – paid or free. End of support also means the end of monthly security updates. Without regular security updates and patches from Microsoft to protect your environment, your company is at risk.

  1. Security risks – Malware protection and attack surface protection become more challenging as products are off lifecycle support. Any new vulnerability may not be disclosed or remediated.
  2. Compliance risks – As time goes on, organizations must adhere to new compliance requirements – for example, GDPR was a massive recent deadline. While managing these requirements on-premises is possible, it is often challenging and time-consuming. Office 365 offers improved compliance features for legal and regulatory requirements. The most notable is that Microsoft cloud environments comply with most regulatory needs, including HIPAA, FISMA, FedRAMP, and more.
  3. Lack of software and hardware support – Lack of technical support for problems that may occur such as bug fixes, stability and usability of the server, and time zone updates. Dropped support for interoperation with 3rd party vendors like MDM and message hygiene solutions can mean your end-user access can stop working. Not to mention the desktop and mobile mail solutions already deployed, or perhaps being upgraded, around this now decade-old infrastructure.
  4. Speaking of old infrastructure – This isn’t just about applications and services. For continued support and to meet compliance requirements, you must migrate to newer hardware to retain, store, and protect your mailbox and associated data. Office 365 absolves you of all infrastructure storage costs. That is a perfect opportunity, and often a justification in and of itself, to move to the cloud.

It’s time to migrate to Office 365 . . . Quickly!

There are many great reasons to move your exchange environment to a hosted environment in Office 365. The biggest one being your company will no longer have to worry about infrastructure costs.

Here are some other significant advantages that you won’t have to worry about:

  • Purchasing, and maintaining expensive storage and hardware infrastructure
  • Time spent keeping up to date on product, security, and time zone fixes
  • Time spent on security patching OS or updating firmware
  • Cost for licensing OS or Exchange Servers
  • Upgrading to a new version of exchange; you’re always on the latest version of Exchange in Office 365
  • Maintaining compliance and regulations for your infrastructure whether Industry, Regional or Government
  • With an environment of thousands of users and potentially unlimited mailboxes, absolving your admins from the day-to-day database, storage, server, and failover management is a huge relief and cost savings by having your team focus on Exchange administration.

Another big cost for on-premises is storage: data repositories for mailbox data retention, archiving, and journaling. This value cannot be overstated – do you have large mailboxes or archive mailboxes? Are you paying for an archiving or eDiscovery solution? If you consider Exchange Online Plan 2 licenses (often bundled into larger enterprise licenses such as E3 or E5) they allow for archive mailboxes of unlimited size. These licenses also offer eDiscovery and compliance options that meet the needs of complex organizations.

The value of the integrated cloud-based security and compliance resources in the Office 365 environment is immense. Many of our customers have abandoned their entire existing MDM solutions in favor of Intune. Data Loss Prevention allows you to protect your company data against exfiltration. Office 365 Advanced Threat Protection fortifies your environment against phishing attacks and offers zero-day attachment reviews. These technologies are just the tip of the iceberg and can either replace or augment an existing malware and hygiene strategy. And all these solutions specifically relate and interoperate with Exchange Online.

CHECK OUT OUR WHITEPAPER & LEARN ABOUT CLOUD-BASED APP MODERNIZATION APPROACHES

Some other technologies that seamlessly work with Exchange Online and offer integral protections to that product as well as other Microsoft cloud and SaaS solutions:

  • Conditional Access – Precise, granular access control to applications
  • Intune – Device and application management and protection
  • Azure AD Identity Protection – Manage risk levels for associate activity
  • Azure Information Protection – Classify and protect documents
  • Identity Governance – Lifecycle management for access to groups, roles, and applications

Think outside the datacenter

data center transformation services

There are advantages to thinking outside the (mail)box when considering an Exchange migration strategy to the cloud. Office 365 offers an incredible suite of interoperability tools to meet most workflows. So while we can partner with you on the journey to Office 365, don’t overlook some of the key tools that are also available in the Microsoft arsenal. These include OneDrive for Business, SharePoint Online, and Microsoft Teams; all of which could be potential next steps in your SaaS journey! Each tool is a game-changer in their own right, and each will bring incredible collaboration value to your associates.

AIS has helped many customers migrate large and complex on-premise environments to Office 365.

Whether you need to:

  • Quickly migrate Exchange to Exchange Online for End of Support
  • Move File services to OneDrive and SharePoint Online for your Personal drives/Enterprise Shares/Cloud File Services
  • Adopt Microsoft Teams from Slack/HipChat/Cisco Teams
  • Migrate large and complex SharePoint farm environments to SharePoint Online

Whatever it is, we’ve got you covered.

What to do next?

Modern Workplace Assessment for Exchange 2010

Take action right now, and start a conversation with AIS today. Our experts will analyze the current state and rollout migration of your organization to Office 365 quickly and seamlessly.

To accelerate your migration to Office 365, let us provide you a free Modern Workplace assessment to evaluate comprehensively:

  • Organization readiness for adoption of Office 365 (Exchange and desktop-focused)
  • Desktop-focused insights and opportunities to leverage Microsoft 365 services
  • Develop total cost of ownership (TCO) for migrating Exchange users to Office 365 including fees for licensing
  • Migration plans cover detailed insights and approaches for service migrations such as…
    • Exchange to Exchange Online
    • File servers, personal shares, and Enterprise shares to OneDrive for Business and SharePoint Online
    • Slack / HipChat / Cisco Teams to Microsoft Teams
    • SharePoint Server to SharePoint Online

GET AN ASSESSMENT OF YOUR EXCHANGE 2010 ENVIRONMENT

Wrapping Up

Migrating your email to Office 365 is your best and simplest option to help you retire your Exchange 2010 deployment. With a migration to Office 365, you can make a single hop from old technology to state-of-the-art features.

AIS has the experience and expertise to evaluate and migrate your on-premise Exchange and collaboration environments to the cloud. Let us focus on the business of migrating your on-premises applications to Office 365, so you can focus on the business of running your business. This is the beginning of a journey, but something AIS is familiar and comfortable guiding you to seamless and successful cloud migration. If you’re interested in learning more about our free modern workplace assessment or getting started with your Exchange migration, reach out to AIS today.

NOT SURE WHERE TO START? REACH OUT TO AIS TO START THE CONVERSATION.

Calling all SharePoint users and Office 365 developers! AIS is hosting this month’s Meetup for the Triangle SharePoint User Group in Morrisville, North Carolina. The Meetup is this Thursday at AIS’ North Carolina office. There are still a few spots left so be sure to RVSP today.

About the Session:

In this session we’ll walk through building a client-side web part with the SharePoint framework. By using generic components, we can build web parts that can be reused across an entire organization or multiple clients. Time permitting, we will walk through several examples and possibly some framework extensions.

Event Agenda:

5:45 p.m.  Doors Open
5:45 to 6:15 p.m.  Networking & Dinner
6:15 p.m.  Announcements & Introductions
6:20 to 7:40 p.m. Presentation

The TriSPUG Meetups are a fantastic way for developers, IT, and business users to learn, share, and grow their knowledge in Microsoft SharePoint and Office 365. Attendance is always free and informal. All interest levels and experience levels are welcome!

RSVP Here!

With the wide variety of updated features available through Office 365, organizations can now create robust, beautiful intranets right out-of-the-box. In contrast to SharePoint classic sites, SharePoint modern sites have a clean interface, are responsive and adaptive to mobile devices, and offer significant performance improvements.

Read part one of this three-part blog series here. 

Read part two here.

Now that you set up your SharePoint libraries to use custom content types, you can add content. Go to the Documents library and upload a few documents to the library. For each document, edit the properties and choose any appropriate values for your custom site columns.

In the example below, All isselected for the AIS Office Location field, Human Resources is selected for the AIS Support Team (department) field, and the value for Show on AIS Connect Home is set to Yes.

Adding content to SharePoint

Read More…

SharePoint logoWith the wide variety of updated features available through Office 365, organizations can now create robust, beautiful intranets right out-of-the-box. In contrast to SharePoint classic sites, SharePoint modern sites have a clean interface, are responsive and adaptive to mobile devices, and offer significant performance improvements.

In the past, many intranets were built as a single large site collection with multiple levels of sub-sites underneath. The modern infrastructure can be flatter, with each department as its own site collection, but connected together through a SharePoint hub site.

Key features of a modern hub site — which make it an ideal starting point for an intranet — include:

  • Cross-site navigation:  consistent top navigation among associated sites
  • Content roll-up:  aggregated news and content among associated sites
  • Consistent look-and-feel: a common theme / branding for associated sites
  • Scoped search:  search content within associated sites

Now let’s walk through the process of creating a new, modern intranet in SharePoint. (Note that for the sake of length and readability, we’ll be publishing this process in three parts here on the blog. The entire guide will be available as a handy download, however, once the series has concluded!)

To start, create a new SharePoint site using a modern communication site design.

Creating a new SharePoint site

Read More…

Calling all SharePoint users and Office 365 developers! Once again, we invite you to attend this month’s Meetup for the Triangle SharePoint User Group in Morrisville, North Carolina. The Meetup is TOMORROW and space in limited, so RSVP today to claim your spot.

About the Session: 

Many traditional SharePoint developers have been caught off guard with the fast pace of changes to the SharePoint ecosystem in recent years. Whether it’s the rapid adoption of Office 365 or the growing investment in cloud-based infrastructure and services, it can all feel very foreign to anyone still using some of the same development approaches and tools first pioneered in SharePoint 2007.

This month’s session will break down traditional SharePoint solutions (such as features, webparts, workflows, event receivers, and timer jobs) and discuss how they translate to modern equivalents in Office 365 and the cloud. We’ll touch on popular topics like the role of SPFX, Power Apps, and Flow, and also other key Azure Services such as Logic Apps, Azure Functions, and Hybrid Data Connections.

You’ll gain an understanding for the growing role of new APIs such as Microsoft Graph, various nuances with authentication, and the importance of hybrid environments and accessing on-premises data. Along the way you’ll discover some of the tools, techniques, and approaches that will be invaluable as you decide what part of your toolbelt will be the most important to upgrade!

About the Speaker: 

Josh Carlisle is a full stack software developer based out of Raleigh, North Carolina working as a Senior Solution Architect at B&R Business Solutions. He has 20 years of development experience from the early days of VB5, COM, ASP, and the birth of .Net to his first adventures with SharePoint development in 2004. His current focus is on architecting, designing, and developing solutions for Azure, Office 365, and SharePoint using the latest front end JavaScript frameworks such as Angular and React alongside service side solutions based on ASP.NET Core and Node.js. Josh also enjoys sharing is knowledge and experience at regional user groups and community events.

Come join your peers and fellow developers for a great session of networking and learning. As always, this event is free but space in limited. RSVP here!

Calling all SharePoint users and Office 365 developers! AIS is sponsoring this month’s Meetup for the Triangle SharePoint User Group in Morrisville, North Carolina. It’s shaping up to be a great one, so RSVP today to claim your spot.

About the Session:

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning are the new buzzwords in the industry. In this session, we will cover Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Services for Office 365 developers.

About the Speaker:

Prashant G. Bhoyar is a Microsoft Office Server & Services MVP and Microsoft Certified Professional. He currently works as a Solution Architect at WithumSmith+Brown, P.C. (formerly Portal Solutions), one of the top 30 accounting and advisory firms in the country. He is a trusted advisor and Subject Matter Expert and specializes in the development and post-implementation adoption of complex custom solutions in Azure, Office 365, and SharePoint. Prashant has supported many government agencies and non-profit organizations in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area. Prashant was the co-author of the book PowerShell for Office 365 and was the technical reviewer of the book Pro SharePoint 2013 Administration.

He serves on the leadership committee for the Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning User Group, and D.C. Metro Office 365 User Group, and SharePoint Saturday Baltimore event and SharePoint Saturday Washington DC event. He actively speaks at technical conferences across the country, most recently in Chicago, Seattle, New Orleans, Baltimore, Philadelphia, as well as, at many events throughout North America. Prashant is a recipient of the “Antarctic Service Medal of the United States of America” for his outstanding service in Antarctica.

Click here for the event’s agenda, location and to claim your spot! Space is limited so RSVP today!