I am pleased to announce my latest Pluralsight course on Power Apps (Well…such is the nature of change in the cloud that there has already been a name change since I submitted this course for publication, only a few weeks back. The aspect of Power Apps covered in my course is now referred to as Canvas Apps.)

This course is designed for developers (both citizen and professional developers) interested in a low-code approach for building mobile applications.

Here’s some background on Power Apps, if you haven’t had a chance to play with it yet:

Power Apps is a productive low-code development platform. It allows you to very quickly build business applications that can run inside a web browser, on a phone or a tablet. Power Apps includes a web-based IDE (Power Apps Studio, a set of built-in cross-platform controls), an Excel-like expression language that also includes imperative constructs like variables and loops, and over 130 connectors to talk to any number of data sources — including SQL Server, Office 365, Salesforce, Twitter, etc. You can also use custom connectors to talk to your domain-specific data source.

Beyond the controls, language expression and connectors, Power Apps provides ALM support in the form of app versioning, app publication to various app stores, swim-lanes for development environments, authentication and authorization (via Azure AD), RBAC controls, and security polices like data loss prevention (DLP).  All in all, the Power Apps service seeks to significantly lower the bar for building and distributing cross-platform mobile applications within your enterprise.

For a concrete example of our use of Power Apps, please read how we built a cross-platform event app in less than a week. Also please check out a recent episode of DotNetRocks where we talk about Power Apps.

Finally, as part of the latest spring update, Power Apps is combining with Dynamics 365 for Sales, Marketing, and Talent applications to offer an enterprise high-productivity application platform as a service (known as Microsoft Business Applications platform). What this means for Power Apps developers is that:

  1. They can now take advantage of server-side logic
  2. They have access to a data-centric way of building declarative apps, known as model-driven apps (in contrast to canvas apps, which are built by dragging and dropping controls to a canvas).

For more information on the spring update, please refer to this blog post by Frank Weigel.

I hope you will find this course useful. Please reach out to me via this blog or Twitter if you have any questions or comments.

Calling all SharePoint users! AIS is sponsoring this month’s Meetup for the Triangle SharePoint Users Group at our Durham, North Carolina office.

The session will start with an overview of SharePoint Custom Forms, which can be developed by Angular JS. We’ll review how to build repeating table information stored into parent/child SharePoint lists. You’ll watch a demo of custom dashboards using REST APIs to display data from multiple SharePoint lists, plus walkthroughs of real-world situations for SharePoint Apps and Power Apps.

Space is limited so RVSP here to claim your spot!

When: Thursday, February 15, 2018
5:45 p.m.
 to 8:00 p.m

Where: 4721 Emperor Blvd
Suite 350
Durham, NC 27703

RSVP today!

Join us tomorrow for a free webinar with AIS’ CTO and Microsoft MVP Vishwas Lele on Microsoft Power Apps and Flow. This webinar is designed to show you how to easily create Power Apps applications, and how to best take advantage of the recently introduced Power Apps custom visual for Power BI.

Vishwas will showcase a Power Apps application that is essentially a “portal” for existing Line of Business Enterprise Applications (inventory, contracts, etc.) and Services (Dynamics, O365, DropBox, etc.) Through the use of Power Apps features like the out-of-the-box connectors, integration with Flow and mobile enablement, you’ll learn how easy it is to build an app that allows users to have all the information they need in one location and on the device of their choice.

The webinar kicks off TOMORROW at 10 a.m. ET. Watch it right here or on Microsoft’s Power BI YouTube.

Microsoft Power Apps and Flow have been generally available since late 2016. They’re both tools that allow business users to streamline business processes without the use of code. Microsoft positioned Power Apps as their recommended replacement for InfoPath as the business user’s forms designer, and Flow as their replacement for SharePoint Workflow.

While these are welcomed replacements, both solutions also provide a broader level of support to the Microsoft stack and across a wide array of third-party applications.  I’ve recently been working with Power Apps and Flow to replace some internal applications, as well as to build proof-of-concepts for our existing clients. Here’s what I think of each, both separately and when putting them together… Read More…

powerappsIt all started with an email from a customer: They wanted an event app for an upcoming regional sales summit. The requirements fit the mold of a typical event app (session schedule and downloadable documents, photo sharing, surveys, sync with Outlook, etc.), but there was one small problem. The app needed to be done in less than a week.

Fortunately, we knew exactly what tools to use and how to put them to work for our client.

Read the rest of the story, and find out exactly how we got the job done, over at the Microsoft PowerApps Blog.