SharePoint Server 2013 offers a completely new architecture for Workflow utilizing Workflow Foundation 4.5.  I’ve already covered the high-level changes in a previous post called “What Changed in SharePoint 2013 Workflow? Pretty Much Everything” and discussed how a SharePoint 2010 Workflow project would be designed differently in my post titled “Redesigning a SharePoint 2010 Workflow Project for SharePoint 2013.”  Both of these posts discuss the new reliance on web services for data in SharePoint Workflow.  While it’s obvious that Visual Studio workflows would interact with web services, SharePoint Designer 2013 offers web service communication, as well.  This post will detail the new actions available in SharePoint Designer 2013 for interacting with web services and how to use them. Read More…
If you have been following any of the news about SharePoint 2013, you already know that the workflow capability has been enhanced significantly. The most important change is that workflows now execute outside SharePoint. Please refer to the diagram below. (This diagram is taken from MSDN with some annotations.) As you can see, workflows are hosted externally. The external host for workflows can either be Windows Azure or customer-provided infrastructure.  Why is this change so important?  Recall all the knobs and switches we had to turn as SharePoint developers to prevent workflow execution from overwhelming the SharePoint farm. Read More…
Visio is a product that all of us in the business solutions world should eventually master. Graphics make very complex information easier to convey and grasp quickly. At this year’s SharePoint Conference, the Visio product team outlined some of the updates they’ve made during the Office 2013 release cycle. The updates for the Office 2013 release center on three major themes: More Professional, Easier Collaboration and Powerful Platform.

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N-tier development is not a new methodology. I remember learning about it in 200-level courses back in 2000, and I used it in ASP.NET development before I jumped on the SharePoint bandwagon. However, one of the things I’ve noticed over the years as a SharePoint developer is that most project development is done in the SharePoint object’s code behind or a few helper classes. This isn’t always the case —sometimes the solution isn’t complex enough to warrant a tiered approach (i.e. a single Event Receiver). But a recent project highlighted the power behind N-tiered architecture.

The client has a custom solution that they provide as a service: A master document (Microsoft Word) is split into section documents (also Word) by a project manager. Each section is assigned to a person to be modified in Word (the client also provides a Word plug-in for this modification). Once the sections are properly marked up, the master document is recreated from the sections. We were brought in to implement this solution in SharePoint 2010. Read More…